A B C D E F J L M P Q R S T W 

Modules

A module is a "self-contained, formally structured learning experience. It should have a coherent and explicit set of ↑learning outcomes, expressed in terms of ↑competences to be obtained, and appropriate assessment criteria".[1] In a modularised system the modules have a fixed ↑workload, 5 credits for example, or a multiple of this number. The workload of a module is based on the total amount of tasks a student is expected to do as part of the overall programme of study. These tasks are defined with a view to the learning outcomes to be achieved, and the time (work hours) a student needs to achieve them. In each degree programme there will usually be compulsory and optional modules. Each module is based on a number of educational activities. They can be defined by considering the following aspects: -  types of courses: lecture, seminar, research seminar, etc. -  types of learning activities: attending lectures, performing specific assignments, writing papers, etc. -  types of assessment: oral examination, written examination, oral presentation, etc.[2] The terms "module" and "↑course unit" are often used synonymously.
ok
Related terms:
↑Accreditation; ↑ECTS – European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System

[1] Directorate-General for Education and Culture: ECTS Users' Guide. European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System and the Diploma Supplement, Brussels, 2005, p. 45; URL: http://ec.europa.eu/education/programmes/socrates/ects/doc/guide_en.pdf (16.5.2006).

[2] Cf. Directorate-General for Education and Culture: ECTS Users' Guide. European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System and the Diploma Supplement, Brussels, 2005, p. 9; URL: http://ec.europa.eu/education/programmes/socrates/ects/doc/guide_en.pdf (16.5.2006).

 
© Ost-West-Wissenschaftszentrum